Thomas Prosser, George V, Mary, and Elizabeth II brown plaque in Harrogate

Railway Station. Before 1848, only aristocratic or wealthy classes could visit Harrogate, but the opening in that year of railway lines to Brunswick and Starbeck stations enabled great numbers of the general public to visit the town in search of health and leisure. Visitors had to travel to central Harrogate by horse-drawn carriage or donkey cart, but in 1862 the North Eastern Railway Company constructed a link line with a new station in the developing area of central Harrogate. Designed by company architect Thomas Prosser, who had also designed York Railway Station, the new station was the first public building in Harrogate to be built of brick. In 1896, an improvement programme provided extended platforms and a beautiful glazed entrance canopy, by which time the station boasted eight platforms. At this time, the often exclusive nature of Harrogate’s visitors entitled the Station Master the rare honour of wearing a silk top hat. In 1965 the Victorian station building was replaced by the present structure designed by Harold Taylor as part of a tower block development. This plaque was presented by Northern Rail in 2012 to mark the 150th anniversary of the opening of central Harrogate’s Railway Station. British Monarchs who have passed through it have included King George V, Queen Mary and Queen Elizabeth II.
Railway Station. Before 1848, only aristocratic or wealthy classes could visit Harrogate, but the opening in that year of railway lines to Brunswick and Starbeck stations enabled great numbers of the general public to visit the town in search of health and leisure. Visitors had to travel to central Harrogate by horse-drawn carriage or donkey cart, but in 1862 the North Eastern Railway Company constructed a link line with a new station in the developing area of central Harrogate. Designed by company architect Thomas Prosser, who had also designed York Railway Station, the new station was the first public building in Harrogate to be built of brick. In 1896, an improvement programme provided extended platforms and a beautiful glazed entrance canopy, by which time the station boasted eight platforms. At this time, the often exclusive nature of Harrogate’s visitors entitled the Station Master the rare honour of wearing a silk top hat. In 1965 the Victorian station building was replaced by the present structure designed by Harold Taylor as part of a tower block development. This plaque was presented by Northern Rail in 2012 to mark the 150th anniversary of the opening of central Harrogate’s Railway Station. British Monarchs who have passed through it have included King George V, Queen Mary and Queen Elizabeth II.

George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert; 3 June 1865 – 20 January 1936) was King of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions, and Emperor of India, from 6 May 1910 until his death.George was a grandson of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert and the first cousin of Tsar Nicholas II of Russia and Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany. From 1877 to 1891, he served in the Royal Navy. On the death of Victoria in 1901, George's father became King Edward VII, and George was made Prince of Wales. On his father's death in 1910, he succeeded as King-Emperor of the British Empire. He was the only Emperor of India to be present at his own Delhi Durbar.As a result of the First World War (1914–18), most other European empires fell while the British Empire expanded to its greatest effective extent. In 1917, George became the first monarch of the House of Windsor, which he renamed from the House of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha as a result of anti-German public sentiment. His reign saw the rise of socialism, communism, fascism, Irish republicanism, and the Indian independence movement, all of which radically changed the political landscape. The Parliament Act 1911 established the supremacy of the elected British House of Commons over the unelected House of Lords. In 1924 he appointed the first Labour ministry and in 1931 the Statute of Westminster recognised the dominions of the Empire as separate, independent states within the Commonwealth of Nations. He was plagued by illness throughout much of his later reign and at his death was succeeded by his eldest son, Edward VIII.

Source: dbpedia

Mary of Teck (Victoria Mary Augusta Louise Olga Pauline Claudine Agnes; 26 May 1867 – 24 March 1953) was Queen of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions, and Empress of India, as the wife of King-Emperor George V.Although technically a princess of Teck, in the Kingdom of Württemberg, she was born and raised in England. Her parents were Francis, Duke of Teck, who was of German extraction, and Princess Mary Adelaide of Cambridge, a member of the British Royal Family. She was informally known as "May", after her birth month. At the age of 24 she was betrothed to Prince Albert Victor, Duke of Clarence and Avondale, the eldest son of the Prince of Wales, but six weeks after the announcement of the engagement he died unexpectedly of pneumonia. The following year she became engaged to Albert Victor's next surviving brother, George, who subsequently became king. Before her husband's accession she was successively Duchess of York, Duchess of Cornwall and Princess of Wales. As queen consort from 1910, she supported her husband through the First World War, his ill-health and major political changes arising from the aftermath of the war and the rise of socialism and nationalism. After George's death in 1936, she became queen mother when her eldest son Edward became king-emperor, but to her dismay he abdicated later the same year in order to marry twice-divorced American socialite Wallis Simpson. She supported her second son, Albert, who succeeded to the throne as George VI, until his death in 1952. She died the following year, during the reign of her granddaughter Queen Elizabeth II, who had not yet been crowned.

Source: dbpedia

Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary; born 21 April 1926) is the constitutional monarch of 16 sovereign states, known as the Commonwealth realms, and their territories and dependencies, and head of the 53-member Commonwealth of Nations. She is Supreme Governor of the Church of England and, in some of her realms, carries the additional title of Defender of the Faith.Upon her accession on 6 February 1952, Elizabeth became Head of the Commonwealth and queen regnant of seven independent Commonwealth countries: the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Pakistan and Ceylon. From 1956 to 1992, the number of her realms varied as territories gained independence and some realms became republics. At present, in addition to the first four of the aforementioned countries, Elizabeth is Queen of Jamaica, Barbados, the Bahamas, Grenada, Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, Tuvalu, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Belize, Antigua and Barbuda, and Saint Kitts and Nevis. She is currently the longest lived and second longest reigning British monarch; only Queen Victoria, her great-great grandmother, reigned longer.Elizabeth was born in London and educated privately at home. Her father acceded to the throne as George VI in 1936 on the abdication of his brother Edward VIII, from which time she was the heir presumptive. She began to undertake public duties during the Second World War, in which she served in the Auxiliary Territorial Service. In 1947, she married Prince Philip of Greece and Denmark, with whom she has four children: Charles, Anne, Andrew, and Edward. Her coronation service took place in 1953 and was the first to be televised.Elizabeth II's many historic visits and meetings include a state visit to the Republic of Ireland, the first state visit of an Irish president to Britain, and reciprocal visits to and from the Pope. Elizabeth has seen major constitutional changes in her realms, such as devolution in the United Kingdom and the patriation of the Canadian constitution. She has also reigned through various wars and conflicts involving many of her realms.Times of personal significance have included the births and marriages of her children and grandchildren, the investiture of the Prince of Wales, and the celebration of milestones such as her Silver, Golden, and Diamond Jubilees in 1977, 2002, and 2012, respectively. Moments of sorrow for her include the death of her father at 56, the assassination of Prince Philip's uncle, Lord Mountbatten, the breakdown of her children's marriages in 1992 (a year deemed her annus horribilis), the death in 1997 of her son's former wife, Diana, Princess of Wales, and the deaths of her mother and sister in 2002. Elizabeth has occasionally faced republican sentiments and severe press criticism of the royal family, but support for the monarchy and her personal popularity remain high.

Source: dbpedia

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